Marginalia #16

Comedic anarchy that feels like the Marx Brothers meets MAD Magazine–though MAD didn’t exist in 1941. There’s a great dance sequence provided by Whitey’s Lindy Hoppers with music by Slim Gaillard and Slam Stewart. Beauty! I can’t explain the excitement of discovering this release. Blood Harvest features Tiny Tim as a potential killer clown. The … Continue reading Marginalia #16

Marginalia #15

Ahh…the Sight and Sound list of greatest films. I’m glad I don’t take those things seriously anymore. I do appreciate seeing the variety of critics’ lists because it challenges me to see movies I may not have come across on my own. Finally saw Vigo’s last film, L’Atalante, which I had confused with von Sternberg’s … Continue reading Marginalia #15

Marginalia #14

I was able to read the second edition that’s coming out next year. Great as a reference, especially if you consider the scores and credits sequences more interesting than most shows themselves. It’s fascinating to get an insight into the process and how it changed over time. The arrangers must have been mainlining speed in … Continue reading Marginalia #14

Marginalia #13

A fascinating history for the film obsessive in your life. While being focused on the development of synching sound to image in movies, it is also a decent history of the studio system. If you’re already interested in the morbid, melancholic, and macabre, then there will be some old friends here. I found the biggest … Continue reading Marginalia #13

Marginalia #10

I feel like I read too many surveys or books that cover a range of topics. This one is certainly an antidote to that. A fascinating, academic look at ilanot (something like Maps of God or Trees of Life) from around 1300 to the initial era of printing. Besides captivating art, this book is an … Continue reading Marginalia #10

Marginalia #9

I’ve been rereading some classic horror including Sheridan Le Fanu’s Carmilla and Stoker’s Lair of the White Worm. Le Fanu is the better writer and sets up a lot for Stoker’s Dracula almost three decades later. These and M. R. James’s ghost stories have filled up my October reading. Kyua (Cure, 1997) is part of … Continue reading Marginalia #9