Marginalia #13

A fascinating history for the film obsessive in your life. While being focused on the development of synching sound to image in movies, it is also a decent history of the studio system. If you’re already interested in the morbid, melancholic, and macabre, then there will be some old friends here. I found the biggest … Continue reading Marginalia #13

Marginalia #12

Not necessarily about Twin Peaks, but about what the show has meant to fans, specifically women who have experienced trauma. I was a little disappointed at first, since I expected more of an analysis of the show, but I realized that I wasn’t the intended audience. I still got a lot from it. Plenty of … Continue reading Marginalia #12

Marginalia #10

I feel like I read too many surveys or books that cover a range of topics. This one is certainly an antidote to that. A fascinating, academic look at ilanot (something like Maps of God or Trees of Life) from around 1300 to the initial era of printing. Besides captivating art, this book is an … Continue reading Marginalia #10

Marginalia #7

Artaud’s manifestos on the Theater of Cruelty. Certainly transferable to other art forms. I read this 20+ years ago after discovering various early-20th Century avant-garde manifestos. Worth a reread with fresh eyes and more experience. Holbein’s paintings are favorites and I’ve always wanted to track these down. Functions like a Memento Mori Tarot. Le danse … Continue reading Marginalia #7

Marginalia #5

More interesting and insightful than I thought it was going to be. Australian folk horror from the early 80s. A precursor to Hereditary, maybe? Genuinely bad, but possibly fun for those with a penchant and the patience for horror on a low budget in the 80s. Takes on apartment horror/possession. Some hilarious dialogue hilariously delivered. … Continue reading Marginalia #5

Marginalia #2

An epic about change and organized around the history of the world. I can’t imagine any reader not knowing some of these stories. I had been meaning to read the whole thing for years, especially after coming across Samuel Beckett’s enthusiasm for it. I can only remember offhand Beckett celebrating Proust, Joyce, and Ovid. Beckett’s … Continue reading Marginalia #2

Marginalia #1

A recent read that gives insight into before and after the folk explosion of the 1960s, referred to here as The Great Folk Scare. Great stories with a personal perspective on an era considered so important because of its connection to songwriters like Bob Dylan and Joan Baez. Van Ronk’s relationship with and stories about … Continue reading Marginalia #1